Not just for the fishes

February 3, 2010

As I snack

I write.

What to write about…?

How about seaweed…?

Ok, seaweed.

What is so special about this stuff anyway? Sure, it smells like the ocean. And, yeah, usually it’s all over the beach. But, what else is there to seaweed besides makin’ sushi?

Oooooooh. Plenty.

A little 411 on seaweed, or better yet, Sea Vegetables.

Sea vegetables are truly a superfood. Recommended for their high nutrient values, sea vegetables also aid in weight loss, cellulite control, detoxification, beautiful hair and skin, and more. Since these vegetables come from the Ocean, they
Here are just some of these sea vegetables’ amazing facts (source):

…the benefits of more than a few of these plants have proven to be absolutely profound. Low in calories and abundant in vitamins and minerals not to be found in land derived foods, sea vegetables stand in a class all their own. For centuries, sea vegetables have been a part of the human diet, particularly for those living in coastal regions. Given that the marine waters where sea vegetables grow is remarkably similar to the constitution of human blood, the health benefits go without saying…Sea vegetables have the potential to boost immune system function and have been proven to do so in multiple laboratory studies conducted across the globe. Sea vegetables have been credited with increasing energy, improving general well being and accelerating wound healing while maximizing the body’s metabolism and anti-aging defenses. Sea vegetables are noted for their anti-inflammatory effects and may help in the treatment of certain skin conditions.

Not only that, but they contain some all-important minerals such as iron and iodine, they’re rich in trace elements which can have a profound effect on human health and well being. Zinc, boron, tin, selenium, chromium, antimony and bismuth, a few of the essential trace minerals that most are not getting in the lacking standard American diet, but are readily available from the sea. In addition, sea vegetables contain E, A, C and B12 (hard to find without meat!). Seaweeds are also used commercially as thickeners and stabilizers in such products as ice cream, instant pudding, whipped toppings, salad dressings, and even toothpaste.

With that said written, why not try some seaweed?
Available at most grocery stores, you will find a small selection of sea vegetables, such as the most commonly know, Nori. Nori is a red-algae sea vegetable that is dried and pressed. Honestly, I use this one a lot. Crumble it on salads or wrap it around quinoa and avocado.

Or you can do as I did and pretty much use those sea veggies on everything!

Oven roasted butternut squash with soaked Arame (my favorite!) in a nutritional yeast, tahini, miso, apple cider vinegar mixture.  And a red cabbage salad.

Here are some other worthy competitors:
Agar Agar
Kombu
Hijiki
Sea Palm
Bladderwrack
Wakame
Dulse
Irish Moss (great in dessert recipes! More on that on some other post…)

Ok, yes, this was a slightly random post but I had to segway into my dinner last night somehow…

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